How can you choose a guardian for your child, especially one with special needs?

On Behalf of | Dec 13, 2021 | Estate Planning, Guardianships | 0 comments

Like most parents, you believe your children deserve the world. To give children everything they need, sometimes you have to plan for a future where you may not be there to care for them. If you have a child with special needs, selecting a guardian may be even more complex. After all, children with special needs may require court appointed guardians after they turn 18 if they lack sufficient capacity to take care of themselves.

How can you ensure you make the best choice for your children? Today’s Caregiver suggests choosing a guardian and solving potential issues regarding your choice in advance.

Create a potential list of candidates

Sometimes, you may know exactly who you want to care for your children, but you should still consider other options. For instance, you may wish your parents to be guardians of your children, but can you guarantee that they care for your children throughout adulthood?  Maybe one of your siblings or even a close friend may be a better choice.

Another factor to consider when it comes to your candidates is how likely your options for a guardian can be a caregiver. Do they know your child well enough to understand your parenting philosophy? Are they willing to undertake a caregiver position?  Do they know your child?

Talk with your potential candidates

You never want to name a guardian for your minor children in your Will without their permission. When you have children with special needs, you have to consider their safety and needs first. If something happens to you, the guardianship may surprise your choice and he or she may not know how to handle your child’s disabilities. When talking with the candidates, let them ask questions. Allow them to think about your request and to decide if it is a good decision.

The choice of who will be a guardian for your children would be included in your Last Will and Testament.  For adult special needs children, you can make recommendations about who you would want, but the final decision will be up to the Court.

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