One of the primary concerns that people in Pittsburgh have regarding estate planning is that as settlors age, the effects of advancing can often hinder the judgment (and thus open them up to being influenced by potential looking to maximize their interests in their estates). This makes it vitally important that people in such a position have representatives who can help them make decisions regarding the management of their assets. However, even some of those tasked with doing so may not be above scrutiny. 

One need only look at the case of a half-brother of the late singing icon Prince to see this. The man inherited a portion of the late singer’s estate after Prince died in 2016. Legal battles have since ensued that have delayed the man receiving his stake in the estate. However, last year the man reportedly sold 90% of his expected inheritance to a music and talent management company. He died later that same day. His will then showed that he left the remainder of his estate to an entertainment consultant from California (who his family says he barely knew and had only entered into his life after news of his inheritance broke). The family has disputed the validity of the will, saying that not only did the consultant prompt the man to change his will, but that the lawyer who filed the will also presided over the sale of his inheritance stake. 

In cases such as this (where enough suspicion exists to question the terms of a will), those who worry that their loved ones were manipulated before their deaths may be justified in raising the alarm. Doing so through a will contest may be much easier if one has an experienced estate planning attorney on their side.